A Handmade Holidays Shopping Page – Year Two!

I’m excited to share a great opportunity for connection with other business owners specializing in handcrafted goods. This year will be Reclaimed for Good’s second annual “Handmade Holiday Shopping Guide”, featuring handmade *very* small businesses.

There will be a webpage dedicated to listing stores and services, and I’ll also feature one store each day on Reclaimed for Good’s social media feed starting in November.

No obligations, fees, or hoops to jump through, I’m just excited to connect people with lots of new creative, handmade stores!

Here’s what the “Handmade Holidays Shopping Guide” will look like:
  1. A dedicated page on my website www.reclaimed4good.com with photos and links to what you’re selling. You can see last year’s page here.
  2. A different shop featured daily on my IG/FB pages starting in November.
  3. Lots of tags in my stories to point people to your handmade goodies!
How to add your shop:
  1. If you’re unfamiliar with Reclaimed for Good and our mission, take some time to look at the website first to make sure it’s a place you’d like your store featured.
  2. Fill out and submit this Google form or click on the button below.
  3. Email a couple of photos to reclaimed4good@gmail.com that you feel best represents what you have to offer.
    ***If you entered your store last year, no need to do the form again, just email me updated info and photos!

Entry deadline is October 30th.

Message, email me, or comment here with any questions!

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The Long Run.

A passel of seven, moving through life together, is bound face a diagnosis or two along the way.  You know the type- the ones that raise your stress, but decrease your ability to breathe.

The past few years have been a season of these for our family.  Seemingly endless doctor appointments, phone calls with scheduling, insurance debacles, and that nagging worry, lurking just above consciousness, that our lives could drastically change at any second.

It’s easy, when the chores don’t get done, work doesn’t get finished, or I have to apologize for the tenth time that day for snapping at the kids, to starting imagining that my walk through life is really just a trudge through a quicksand laden swamp.

Taking up running (and FitMooney yoga sessions!) has helped keep me from that quicksand. Most days.

Recently I was running at a track while my mom walked.  Every time I passed her I gasped, “This is so hard!  I don’t know what’s wrong today!”  It wasn’t until I had finished my personal race that I checked the time and realized I had run a pace that was a minute and twelve seconds faster per mile than what I usually do.

In the midst of my abnormally arduous exercise, when I felt like I was failing, I was actually doing the best I ever have.

It taught me two things that I’m going to keep close to my heart:

One – it’s okay to slow down.
Two – I’m doing better than I think I am.

And if no one has told you that truth today, keep reading. 

It’s okay to slow down. 

You’re doing so much better than you think you are.



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Common Zip Pouch Dimensions- Printable!

This post is part of the “Build a Zip Pouch Series“, giving you the skills you need to sew custom zip pouches in a variety of styles and sizes. Links will be added to the series homepage (here!) as new tutorials go live.

Once you know the basic zip pouch pattern, you can make a custom pouch in any style, length, width, and depth that you’d like! Our Custom Zip Pouch post will give you the tools you need to figure out just what size of fabric to cut for any desired final size.

Custom sizing projects can be a lot of fun, BUT sometimes is easier to have a few go-sizes. Especially for those days you’d love to sew a pouch, but don’t really want to wrap your mind around the math.

That’s what this printable is for! I’ve put together cut dimensions for five of the most common zip pouch sizes. These are the sizes I make the most often, both to sell and to use personally. I hope it’s as useful to you as it is to me!

Grab this handy quick reference sheet by clicking here or on the image below. Happy sewing :).


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Adding Hand Embroidery to a Zip Pouch

This tutorial is part of the “Build a Zip Pouch Series“, giving you the skills you need to sew custom zip pouches in a variety of styles and sizes. Links will be added to the series homepage (here!) as new tutorials go live.

A great way to add a personal touch to your zip pouch is with hand embroidery. This works especially well for me because most of the reclaimed fabric I use is solid colored. Hand embroidery allows me to include more color and customization to a pouch, while still sticking with my preferred fabric- denim!

Here are my best tips for hand embroidery on denim or other heavy weight fabric. If you’re using a lighter weight fabric, don’t worry, there are tips for you too!


Pattern Application

There are multiple ways to transfer an embroidery pattern to your chosen fabric.

The easiest way to transfer an embroidery pattern to a heavy/opaque fabric is to use Sulky Solvy Stabilizer (or another washaway embroidery stabilizer). Simply print the pattern onto the stabilizer, stick it on your fabric, stitch over the pattern, and then rinse away the sticker. Of course, traditional transfer paper and/or pencils work well too.

Another fun, and even more custom, option is to draw directly on the fabric with a water soluble marker. I use this option when writing words on my zip pouches. It’s easy to make sure you’re getting the words the right size for the fabric this way!

Pattern application tips:

  • Remember to leave margin for pouch assembly. If you have a 1/4″ seam allowance, leave at least a 1/4″ border around the embroidery pattern. Ignore this tip if you DO want your pattern to run all the way to the edges (as I do with the beginning and ending letters when writing cursive words).
  • If you are boxing the bottom of your pouch, adjust your pattern accordingly. For example, if you are boxing your corners at 1″, make sure the embroidery pattern is at least 1/2″ + the seam allowance from the bottom of the fabric.
  • Consider stitching on your fabric before trimming it down to the size you need. It’s easier to stitch on a larger piece that can fit in a hoop!

Stitching

Follow the stitching directions of your chosen pattern. If you are stitching mostly words, I recommend using a simple backstitch. Use shorter stitches when going around curves. For more depth when stitching in cursive, use two overlapping backstitches on the downstrokes.

When embroidering on denim or another heavier weight fabric, I use all six strands of embroidery floss. This helps the stitching stand out better. If you are stitching on a lighter weight fabric, use two or three strands of floss instead. Also, consider using a fusible interfacing/stabilizer for the back of the fabric or stitching through two layers instead of just the one.


Finishing

After stitching, rinse off your transfer method if needed. Thoroughly dry the fabric before assembling it into a pouch. Sew as normal, then flip right side out to enjoy your unique addition to a simple zip pouch!


Suggestions

There are endless possibilities for hand embroidery pattern choices. Pretty much anything you can draw or print from a computer, you can stitch!

When it comes to words, I usually like to keep it simple these days and stitch my kids’ or my own handwriting. I also have some go-to encouraging phrases to use on my upcycled tote bags – you can find those here :).

If you’d rather write your own phrase or word, it’s easy to create a pattern. Open a word document and add a text box the size you desire. My favorite fonts for stitching are Dancing Script and Gadugi, but you can choose any font you’d like.

I can’t wait to see how you embellish your own unique zip pouches!


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How to Add Rounded Corners to a Zip Pouch

This tutorial is part of the “Build a Zip Pouch Series“, giving you the skills you need to sew custom zip pouches in a variety of styles and sizes. Links will be added to the series homepage (here!) as new tutorials go live.

Adding rounded corners at the bottom of you zip pouch can be an alternative to either the simple square corners or the more complicated boxed corners. And, luckily, it’s an easy process. Just follow a basic zip pouch tutorial, but prepare the corners as described below!


Curving the Corners

To prepare your fabric for rounded corners, place each lining and exterior piece on your cutting surface. You can do this after inserting the zipper (as I did in the example below) or before. You will be rounding the bottom two corners of each exterior and lining piece.

There are fancy rulers you can use for this step OR you can just grab a round object from around your sewing room (or kitchen) that has the curve you like! I’ve used a mug, plate, bowl, toilet paper roll, and whatever else has been handy. Right now I use a sticker from PureJoyCreative because it’s just the right curve, plus it brings a smile to my face :).

Place whatever round object you’ve chosen on the bottom edge of your fabric. Line up the sides of the pouch with the sides of the circle. Trace along the curve. I use a sharpie or pen since this line will be trimmed off after sewing. Air or water soluble fabric markers work well too.

Repeat the process on all four of the bottom corners (the corners not sewn into the zipper).


Sew your pouch together as you normally would, leaving a turning hole in the lining. When you approach the corners, follow along the marker line as if it was the edge of the fabric. Go slowly for a neat curve.Trim the seam allowance and clip along the curves.

Turn right side out. Roll the seams to neaten them, then sew the turning hole closed and you’re done!


Tips
  • It can be difficult to make curved corners lay nicely with especially bulky fabric. Keep that in mind when choosing which types of corners to use on your pouch!
  • Sew very slowly around the curves, trying not to stop/start at all to shift.
  • Consider shortening your stitch length slightly at the curves.


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Custom Sizing Your Zip Pouch

This tutorial is part of the “Build a Zip Pouch Series“, giving you the skills you need to sew custom zip pouches in a variety of styles and sizes. Links will be added to the series homepage (here!) as new tutorials go live.

Once you know the basic zip pouch pattern, you can make a custom pouch in any style, length, width, and depth that you’d like! This post will give you the tools to figure what dimensions you’ll need to cut your fabric. The easiest way to do this is by working backwards from what size you’d like your final pouch to be to what fabric sizes you’ll need to cut.

Note: If you’d rather not do the number crunching yourself, this post has a printable with common zip pouch dimensions already “mathed out” for you!


1. What height and width do you want the final pouch to have?

First, decide what size zip pouch you’d like to end up with. One way to do this is to measure the objects you’re planning on storing in the pouch.

For example, I’d like to make a zip pouch to carry my phone, driver’s license, and some cash/credit cards. First I’m going to measure my phone. It’s 7″ x 3″, but I’m going to add 1/2″ to each side to ensure that my phone will be able to slip easily in and out of the finished pouch. I end up wanting a pouch that’s 8″ wide and 4″ high.


2. Are you adding any depth to the base (i.e. boxed corners)?

If the contents of your pouch are on the slim side or you’re looking to keep things simple, you won’t need this step to add depth. Instead, you’ll finish with the standard 90 degree corners or rounded ones.

If you do want depth, you’ll need to adjust your dimensions accordingly. This post covers boxed corner basics, but I’ll give a quick overview below too.

When you box a bottom corner of a zip pouch, you’ll be taking away some of the height and width of the pouch in the process. For example, if you sew a 1″ wide boxed corner, you’ll create 1″ in depth for your pouch. This will cause the bottom of your pouch to be 1″ shorter in width and 1/2″ shorter in height. Account for this difference in your cut measurements by adding 1/2″ in height to each lining and exterior piece and 1″ in width.

I would like 1/2″ of depth at the bottom of my pouch. To achieve this, I’ll add 1/4″ in height to each piece and 1/2″ of width, bringing my cut pieces to 8 1/2″ wide and 4 1/4″ high.


3. Add seam allowances.

Before you head off to cut your custom dimensions, don’t forget to add in seam allowances!

Don’t worry if you can’t find a zipper in just the right length for your custom dimensions, you can always cut down a longer zipper!

I usually sew zip pouches with a standard 1/4″ seam allowance, bringing my final cut pieces to 9″ across and 4 3/4″ high.

Here are my custom sized pieces with the zipper inserted.

4. Assemble with preferred method.

Once you’ve done all the math, you’re ready to sew using your favorite method. Check out the Basic Zip Pouch if you need a straightforward tutorial!

I chose to topstitch just the lining of my custom sized pouch, then follow the Basic Zip Pouch assembly (without sewing down the zipper ends), and box my corners. My final results are below.

I can’t wait to see what you come up with!

Ready to be put to use!

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How to Add Boxed Corners to a Zip Pouch

This tutorial is part of the “Build a Zip Pouch Series“, giving you the skills you need to sew custom zip pouches in a variety of styles and sizes. Links will be added to the series homepage (here!) as new tutorials go live.

If the contents of your pouch are on the slim side or you’re looking to keep things simple, you won’t need this step to add depth. Instead, you’ll finish with the standard 90 degree corners or rounded ones.

If you do want depth to your pouch, you’ll need to adjust the cut dimensions accordingly or be okay with a slightly smaller zip pouch in height and width. For a great, thorough, description of how to calculate depth with boxed bottom corners, check out this post (you need to scroll down a bit to get to the actual tutorial). I’ll cover the basics and my favorite method below.


Figuring Out Cut Dimensions

When you box a bottom corner of your zip pouch, you’ll be taking away some of the height and width of the pouch in the process. For example, if you sew a 1″ wide boxed corner, you’ll create 1″ in depth for your pouch. Doing this will cause the bottom of your pouch to be 1″ shorter in width and 1/2″ shorter in height. Account for this difference in your cut measurements by adding 1/2″ in height to each lining and exterior piece and 1″ in width.

Note: With larger boxed bottoms, there will be a noticeable difference between the length of the zipper top and the length of the bottom. It’s not as noticeable on smaller sized boxed bottoms (1″ or less). If you’d like to have the bottom and the top of the pouch be exactly the same length, while still adding depth, just add the extra width to the bottom of the pattern piece you’re making, then draw a diagonal line from the shorter top edge to the longer bottom edge.


Cutting the Corners

To prepare your fabric for boxed corners, place each lining and exterior piece on your cutting surface. You can do this after inserting the zipper (as I did in the example below) or before. You will be cutting the squares out of the bottom two corners of each exterior and lining piece.

The width and height of the square cutout needs to be one half of the depth you desire.

Sticking with our 1″ boxed corner example, I cut 1/2″ x 1/2″ squares out of the bottom corners of each fabric piece of my pencil pouch.


Sewing the Corners

Before sewing the boxed corners, sew around the rest of the pouch with a 1/4″ seam allowance. After the side, top, and bottom seams have been sewn (make sure to still leave a turning hole in the bottom!), you’ll move on to sewing the four boxed corners.

Pinch the cut corners (one pinch on the lining side and one pinch on the exterior side). Pull the two corners away from each other so the right sides lay flat together, forming a straight line. Line up the side and bottom seams, nesting them (have the seams laying in opposite directions). Clip or pin in place then sew using the same seam allowance you used for the rest of the pouch.

Repeat with the other three corners before trimming seams and turning the pouch right side out.


Summary

To figure out the cut measurements for a custom sized zip pouch with a boxed bottom use the following: Add half of the desired depth (boxed bottom) to the height of each cut piece. Add the entire desired depth (boxed bottom) to the width of each cut piece.

To figure out how a boxed bottom will alter the dimensions of already cut fabric: Subtract half of the desired depth (boxed bottom) from the height of the zip pouch. Subtract the entire desired depth (boxed bottom) from the width of the zip pouch.


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Sewing a Zip Pouch with Stretchy Fabric

This tutorial is part of the “Build a Zip Pouch Series“, giving you the skills you need to sew custom zip pouches in a variety of styles and sizes. Links will be added to the series homepage (here!) as new tutorials go live.

Once you start sewing, you quickly learn that not all fabrics are created equal. Some fabrics are better suited for quilts, some for bags, some for accessories, etc. etc. etc. Zip pouches can be sewn with a variety of fabrics, but extra care needs to be taken when that fabric is stretchy.

I’ll be honest. I generally try to avoid sewing zip pouches and bags with stretchy fabric. “Try” being the key word. Sometimes the perfect color of denim ends of having spandex in it or the logo I want to highlight is from a jersey shirt. Here are my best tips when having to sew a zip pouch with stretchy fabric.



Tips for Sewing a Zip Pouch with Stretchy Fabric

Fusible Interfacing

If you fabric is light enough, fuse some Pelon SF101 (or similar interfacing) onto the backside to lessen the stretch and provide stability. I don’t recommend using interfacing with already heavy denim, though, because it will add even more bulk to the seams.

Ballpoint Needle

Switch over to a ballpoint needle. This can make a big difference with skipping stitches and neat topstitching.

Strategic Sewing

When I do use a stretchy fabric for a zip pouch, I try to make sure either the exterior or lining fabric is woven. Having only one part of the pouch with stretch helps keep the zipper sandwich sew up more nicely.

Also, while sewing your zipper sandwich, sew with the most stretchy fabric on the bottom (closer to the feed dogs) and the least stretchy fabric on top (directly under the presser foot).

Tape/Glue Stick

Consider using double sided tape or a regular glue stick along the top edge of the fabric (instead of pins/clips) when making your zipper sandwich. Just make sure that the tape/glue stays within the seam allowance or it will show along the edge of the zipper when you flip it right sides out.

Trim, Trim, Trim

Sometimes no matter what you do, you’ll end up with the fabrics not quilt aligning after you sew a zipper into stretchy fabric. In that case, don’t be afraid to trim! After you insert and top stitch your zipper, close the zipper and press well. Lay the half finished pouch on your cutting surface with both of the exterior pieces right sides up. Trim along the edges to neaten them before finishing assembly.


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Choosing Materials for Your Custom Zip Pouch

This tutorial is part of the “Build a Zip Pouch Series“, giving you the skills you need to sew custom zip pouches in a variety of styles and sizes. Links will be added to the series homepage (here!) as new tutorials go live.


The beauty of sewing your own zip pouch is that, with a little bit of tweaking, you can use a wide variety of fabrics. I know the choices can be overwhelming, though. I’m here for you!

You’ll need exterior fabric and lining fabric. Lining fabric is the simpler choice of the two (see quilting cotton/medium weight fabric below).

But it’s fun to get a little more creative with the exterior fabric! Let’s check out some of your options.


Quilting cotton (or other medium weight fabrics).

Quilting cotton is widely available and comes in a variety of colors and designs, making it a great choice for myriad projects, zip pouches included!  A medium weight fabric such as quilting cotton can be used as-is for lining material.  However, I recommend adding thickness if you’d like to use it for your exterior material.  Adding thickness can be done in two ways:  using a fusible interfacing such as Pelon SF101 or quilting the exterior onto a piece of low loft batting.  

A medium weight fabric is great because you can piece it into a quilt or improv block to add yet another custom dimension to your creation!

Reclaimed material options for medium weight fabrics:  Destashed fabric at thrift stores, button down shirts and skirts, old quilt blocks, and lightweight curtains.


Denim (or other heavy weight fabrics).

Denim is great for zip pouches.  My favorite is denim reclaimed from jeans that do not have spandex/stretch in them.  You can use stretchy denim, just be aware that it may be a bit distorted after inserting the zipper and require trimming before zip pouch assembly.  Tip:  when using stretchy fabric, place the material with the least stretch on top when sewing.  

Upholstery fabric, canvas, and other heavy weight fabrics work too, but can be hard on your machine if you don’t use a sharp needle!  Also, it’s difficult to get a nice looking top stitch on canvas.  Because of that, I prefer to topstitch the lining only when using canvas as my exterior material.

For lining material, I sometimes use lightweight denim (from an old shirt, for example).  

Reclaimed material options for heavy weight fabrics:  Upholstery, curtains, jeans, khakis, and duffel bags.


Lightweight fabrics. 

I don’t recommend using fabrics of a lighter weight than quilting cotton for the exterior of a zipper pouch because of the wear and tear that comes with use.  If you do use a lightweight fabric, such as a light linen, use interfacing and/or quilt the fabric onto a piece of batting first.  Also, interface lightweight fabric with a fusible interfacing before using it as lining.

An alternative to using a lightweight piece of fabric for the exterior of a zip pouch is to use it as embellishment over a heavier weight fabric instead.  You can create a bow, ribbon, or other applique piece!


Knits/Stretchy Fabrics.

Knits and stretchy fabrics can be used when sewing zip pouches, BUT I highly recommend using a fusible interfacing.  Fusing a piece of Pelon SF 101 (or comparable interfacing) onto the back of a knit fabric before sewing with it will provide the stability you need for a zip pouch.  Logos from old t-shirts can be a great option for zip pouch exteriors.  Interfaced knits can also be used as lining material. See my full tips here for sewing zip pouches with stretchy fabric!

Reclaimed material options for knit fabric:  Old t-shirts, pillow covers, and destashed fabric at thrift stores.


Just For Fun.

You really can use just about anything to create a custom zip pouch.  After making memory quilts and pillows with a number of button down shirts, I used the left over shirt cuffs to make a pouch. I’ve also use feed sacks, and even coffee sleeves to embellish another pouch. You can even design your own fabric! Get creative and have fun!


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Choosing a Topstitch Style for Your Zipper Pouch

This tutorial is part of the “Build a Zip Pouch Series“, giving you the skills you need to sew custom zip pouches in a variety of styles and sizes. Links will be added to the series homepage (here!) as new tutorials go live.


There are an endless number of ways to sew a zip pouch. Each one serves a purpose and suits a style, but it can be confusing to figure out what combo of insertion and top stitching will work best for your pouch! In my Basic Zip Pouch Tutorial, I inserted the zipper by first stitching back the zipper ends so they wouldn’t be sewn into the side seams. Some people prefer to skip tacking back the ends and sew the full length of the zipper along the full width of the fabric, as shown below. That works too!

Simply line the entire zipper up along the fabric, and sew into place!
Here’s what it looks like sandwiched between the exterior and lining pieces.

Whether you choose to sew back your tabs or use the full length of the zipper, you’ll have another choice to make when it comes to the topstitching step. It’s important to not skip topstitching, since this is what keeps the fabric from getting caught in the zipper when you use your pouch. You do have three options to choose from, though! Each of these topstitching methods work regardless of how you inserted your zipper. However, the photos below show how the topstitching looks specifically on zippers inserted as shown above (without the ends folded back).


Option 1 – Topstitch the Exterior Only

When topstitching just the exterior fabric, the stitching will only be visible on the exterior of your finished zip pouch.

Best used when:
1. Your lining fabric is stretchy
2. The exterior fabric isn’t overly bulky/heavy
3. You just like the look 🙂

Topstitch:
1. Press the exterior fabric fold along the zipper edge with a hot iron (don’t touch the zipper teeth or they’ll melt!).
2. To sew the first side, flip the lining piece under the opposite side (as shown in the left photo below).
3. Sew through the exterior fabric fold 1/8″ away from the zipper edge, using a slightly longer stitch length.
4. Repeat Steps 2 & 3 with the other side.

Exterior fabric after topstitching just the exterior.
Lining fabric after topstitching just the exterior.

Assembly after topstitching:
*See the Basic Zip Pouch Tutorial for full assembly instructions.
1. Line the zipper sides up as shown below, with the zipper teeth towards the lining fabric. (Note: Just the exterior fabric will be folded over itself along the zipper.)
2. Make sure your zipper is halfway open!
3. Pin in place, then sew all the way around the zip pouch with a 1/4″ seam allowance, leaving a 1-2″ hole in the lining for turning.
4. Trim corners and seams as necessary, then turn right side out.


Option 2 – Topstitch the Lining Only

When topstitching just the lining fabric, the stitching will only be visible on the lining interior of your finished zip pouch.

Best used when:
1. Your lining fabric is not stretchy
2. The exterior fabric is bulky or heavy (i.e. heavy duty denim or a quilt block)
3. You just like the look 🙂

Topstitch:
1. Press the lining fabric fold along the zipper edge with a hot iron (don’t touch the zipper teeth or they’ll melt!).
2. To sew the first side, flip the exterior piece under the opposite side (Note: The zip pouch in the photos has two different exterior fabrics, one is white and the other is bleached denim)
3. Sew through the lining fabric fold 1/8″ away from the zipper edge, using a slightly longer stitch length.
4. Repeat Steps 2 & 3 with the other side.

Exterior fabric after topstitching just the lining.
Lining fabric after topstitching just the lining.

Assembly after topstitching:
*See the Basic Zip Pouch Tutorial for full assembly instructions.
1. Line the zipper sides up as shown below, with the zipper teeth towards the lining fabric. (Note: The lining fabric will be folded back over itself at the zipper.)
2. Make sure your zipper is halfway open!
3. Pin in place, then sew all the way around the zip pouch with a 1/4″ seam allowance, leaving a 1-2″ hole in the lining for turning.
4. Trim corners and seams as necessary, then turn right side out.


Option 3 – Topstitch both the Lining and the Exterior

When topstitching both the lining and exterior fabrics, the stitching will be visible on both exterior and lining of your finished zip pouch. If your lining and exterior fabrics are different colors and you want to use matching thread, match the top thread to your exterior fabric and the bobbin thread to your lining fabric.

Best used when:
1. You’re worried about excess fabric getting caught in the zipper
2. The exterior fabric isn’t overly bulky/heavy and the lining isn’t stretchy
3. You just like the look 🙂

Topstitch:
1. Press exterior and lining fabrics, wrong sides together along the zipper edge fold with a hot iron (don’t touch the zipper teeth or they’ll melt!).
2. To sew the first side, keep exterior and lining fabric wrong sides together. You’ll be sewing through 5 layers on each side (2 from a folded exterior, 2 from a folded lining, and 1 from the zipper tape).
3. Sew through the exterior fabric fold 1/8″ away from the zipper edge, using a slightly longer stitch length.
4. Go nice and s l o w l y with this method since you’ll see both sides of the stitching in your finished zip pouch!
5. Repeat Steps 2-4 with the other side.

Exterior fabric after topstitching both the lining and exterior.

Lining fabric after topstitching both the lining and exterior.

Assembly after topstitching:
*See the Basic Zip Pouch Tutorial for full assembly instructions.
1. Line the zipper sides up as shown below, with the zipper teeth pushed towards the lining fabric.
2. With this method, you will be sewing over more bulk at the zipper seam. Take it slowly and use a hump jumper if needed. (You can make your own “hump jumper” by using a folded piece of fabric or cardboard – no need to buy one!)
2. Make sure your zipper is halfway open.
3. Pin in place, then sew all the way around the zip pouch with a 1/4″ seam allowance, leaving a 1-2″ hole in the lining for turning.
4. Trim corners and seams as necessary, then turn right side out.



Here are all three options next to one another. Which do you like best? Is there one style you use the most in your sewing practice?


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